AMIA Health Policy Conference Series (Maryland)

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Summary:

Since 2006, AMIA has convened annual health policy invitational meetings to address emerging issues and innovations in health, information technology (IT), and clinical technologies. As an objective convener, AMIA’s meetings present the issues from diverse perspectives, discuss challenges and solutions, and make public policy and research-oriented recommendations. Past themes have included: clinical data capture and documentation; health data use, stewardship, and governance; and patient-centered care. The AHRQ Health IT Portfolio has provided ongoing support to facilitate the AMIA Policy Invitational Meetings. The meetings included plenary sessions, breakout sessions, and large group discussions.

The 2012 AMIA Health Policy Invitational Meeting, “Health Data Use, Stewardship and Governance: Ongoing Gaps and Challenges,” sought to further understanding of data use, re-use, stewardship, and governance to meet challenges posed by new and emerging sources of health data.

AMIA’s 2013 Health Policy Meeting, “Advancing Patient-Centered Care, Collaboration, Communication, and Coordination,” focused on how the future state of health, wellness, and care will increasingly include the active participation of patients, families, and caregivers through data use, re-use, stewardship and governance in the delivery and management of patient-centered care; and to address the informatics-related challenges posed by the sharing and management of both clinician- and patient-generated health data.

The primary purpose of the 2014 AMIA Health Policy Invitational Meeting, “Harnessing Next-Generation Informatics for Personalizing Medicine,” was to develop recommendations for future policies and identify research needs for advancing personalized medicine.

The topic of the 2015 AMIA Invitational Policy Meeting was “Unlocking the Potential of Electronic Health Records: How Policymakers Can Impact the Ongoing Evolution of EHRs.” The 2015 meeting sought to build on a year-long project conducted by AMIA’s EHR 2020 Task Force to develop policy recommendations for the next phase in EHR evolution.

The outcomes and products from the meetings include a summary report with recommendations, a short-range action and research plan (2-3 years) that could be pursued by the participants and other stakeholders in order to address the issues, and one or more manuscripts for submission to JAMIA or elsewhere.

AMIA Health Policy Conference Series - 2012

Summary Highlights

  • Principal Investigator: 
  • Funding Mechanism: 
    PAR: HS09-257: AHRQ Grant Program for Large Conference Support (R13)
  • Grant Number: 
    R13 HS 021825
  • Project Period: 
    September 2012 - July 2015
  • AHRQ Funding Amount: 
    $230,014
  • PDF Version: 
    (PDF, 164.51 KB)

Summary: Since 2006, the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) has convened annual health policy invitational meetings to address emerging issues and innovations in health, information technology (IT), and clinical technologies. As an objective convener, AMIA’s meetings present the issues from diverse perspectives, discuss challenges and solutions, and make public policy and research-oriented recommendations. The 2012 AMIA Health Policy Invitational Meeting, “Health Data Use, Stewardship and Governance: Ongoing Gaps and Challenges,” sought to further understanding of data use, re-use, stewardship, and governance to meet challenges posed by new and emerging sources of health data.

The ethical, political, and technical complexities of health data use and re-use require a closer examination of policies. The accelerated adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) due to the Medicare and Medicaid Meaningful Use EHR Incentive Program coupled with new and emerging health information technologies has increased the availability of health care data. Secondary uses of data including research, quality improvement, performance measurement, and public health monitoring have the potential to improve patient care. Use of these data, however, must be accompanied by caution for patient privacy and data security. Additionally, data users must be aware of data quality issues when using patient data beyond its original purpose of patient care. With the growing importance of patient-centered health care and patient empowerment through electronic access to medical records, it is critical that consumers understand how health data are being used and have confidence that their identity is protected.

Specific Aims:

  • Articulate a framework for the re-use and governance of health data, recognizing that different stakeholders have different data needs and priorities. (Ongoing)
  • Formulate policy recommendations, a research agenda, and action steps directed to government, industry, academia, and other stakeholders that outline how health data use practices can best be supported by health IT and informatics. (Ongoing)
  • Synthesize and disseminate the meeting findings and recommendations via a report and other mechanisms that will inform the policymaking process in this domain and identify key efforts to move action and research agendas forward. (Ongoing)

2012 Activities: The 2012 AMIA Health Policy Invitational Meeting was held December 12th and 13th in Washington, DC. A 19-person steering committee planned and conducted the conference. The steering committee was chaired by George Hripcsak, M.D., M.S., Director of Medical Informatics Services at New York-Presbyterian Hospital and Chair of Columbia University’s Department of Biomedical Informatics.

The meeting included plenary sessions, breakout sessions, and a large group discussion.

Preliminary Impact and Findings: This project has no findings to date.

Target Population: General

Strategic Goal: Develop and disseminate health IT evidence and evidence-based tools to support patient-centered care, the coordination of care across transitions in care settings, and the use of electronic exchange of health information to improve quality of care.

Business Goal: Synthesis and Dissemination

AMIA Health Policy Conference Series - Final Report

Citation:
Kuperman G. AMIA Health Policy Conference Series - Final Report. (Prepared by the American Medical Informatics Association under Grant No. R13 HS021825). Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 2015. (PDF, 327.06 KB)

The findings and conclusions in this document are those of the author(s), who are responsible for its content, and do not necessarily represent the views of AHRQ. No statement in this report should be construed as an official position of AHRQ or of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
Principal Investigator: 
Document Type: 
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